Коломойський і Боголюбов вивели 5,5 мільярдів із «Приватбанку» через філію на Кіпрі – OCCRP

За кілька місяців до початку націоналізації гроші були виведені на особисті рахунки Коломойського в Швейцарії, Австрії та Люксембурзі – журналісти

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Коломойський і Боголюбов вивели 5,5 мільярдів із «Приватбанку» через філію на Кіпрі – OCCRP

За кілька місяців до початку націоналізації гроші були виведені на особисті рахунки Коломойського в Швейцарії, Австрії та Люксембурзі – журналісти

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Judge: Federal Land Coal Sales Need Review

A federal judge Friday ruled that the Trump administration failed to consider potential damage to the environment from its decision to resume coal sales from U.S. lands, but the court stopped short of halting future sales.

U.S. District Judge Brian Morris in Montana said Interior Department officials had wrongly avoided an environmental review of their action by describing it “as a mere policy shift.” In so doing, officials ignored the environmental effects of selling huge volumes of coal from public lands, the judge said.

The ruling marks another in a string of judicial setbacks for President Donald Trump’s attempts to boost North American energy production.

A previous order from Morris blocked the proposed Keystone XL pipeline that would transport crude from Canada’s oil sands. Other courts have issued rulings against the administration’s plans for oil and gas leasing and coal mining.

40% US coal from federal lands

More than 40% of U.S. coal is mined from federal lands, primarily in Western states. Companies have mined about 4 billion tons of coal from federal reserves in the past decade, contributing $10 billion to federal and state coffers through royalties and other payments.

The Obama administration imposed a moratorium on most federal coal sales in 2016. The move followed concerns that low royalty rates paid by mining companies were shortchanging taxpayers and that burning the fuel was making climate change worse.

Trump lifted the moratorium in March 2017 as part of his efforts to revitalize the slumping coal industry.

“The moratorium provided protections on public lands for more than 14 months,” Morris said in Friday’s 34-page order. He added that lifting the moratorium was a “major federal action” sufficient to trigger requirements for a detailed analysis of its environmental impacts.

Consider the consequences

Morris ordered government attorneys to enter negotiations with states, tribal officials and environmental groups in order to determine the next steps in the case.

“The court held clearly that the Trump administration needs to rationally consider the consequences of its decision. Those include dire impacts to clean water, public health and our climate,” said Earthjustice attorney Jenny Harbine, who represents environmental groups and the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, which had sued to stop the lease sales.

The attorneys general of California, New Mexico, New York and Washington, all Democrats, also had sued over the resumption of the federal coal lease program. They said it should not have been revived without studying what’s best for the environment and for taxpayers.

Representatives of the Interior Department did not immediately respond to emailed and telephone requests for comment.

Utah coal leases

In February, Interior officials had announced a sale of coal leases on public lands in Utah by issuing a statement headlined “The War on Coal is Over.” They said the sale would not have been possible if the administration had not overturned the moratorium.

The department’s Bureau of Land Management administers about 300 coal leases in 10 states. Most of that coal, 85%, comes from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Other states with significant federal coal reserves include Colorado and New Mexico.

Production and combustion of coal from federal lands accounted for about 11% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2014.

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Judge: Federal Land Coal Sales Need Review

A federal judge Friday ruled that the Trump administration failed to consider potential damage to the environment from its decision to resume coal sales from U.S. lands, but the court stopped short of halting future sales.

U.S. District Judge Brian Morris in Montana said Interior Department officials had wrongly avoided an environmental review of their action by describing it “as a mere policy shift.” In so doing, officials ignored the environmental effects of selling huge volumes of coal from public lands, the judge said.

The ruling marks another in a string of judicial setbacks for President Donald Trump’s attempts to boost North American energy production.

A previous order from Morris blocked the proposed Keystone XL pipeline that would transport crude from Canada’s oil sands. Other courts have issued rulings against the administration’s plans for oil and gas leasing and coal mining.

40% US coal from federal lands

More than 40% of U.S. coal is mined from federal lands, primarily in Western states. Companies have mined about 4 billion tons of coal from federal reserves in the past decade, contributing $10 billion to federal and state coffers through royalties and other payments.

The Obama administration imposed a moratorium on most federal coal sales in 2016. The move followed concerns that low royalty rates paid by mining companies were shortchanging taxpayers and that burning the fuel was making climate change worse.

Trump lifted the moratorium in March 2017 as part of his efforts to revitalize the slumping coal industry.

“The moratorium provided protections on public lands for more than 14 months,” Morris said in Friday’s 34-page order. He added that lifting the moratorium was a “major federal action” sufficient to trigger requirements for a detailed analysis of its environmental impacts.

Consider the consequences

Morris ordered government attorneys to enter negotiations with states, tribal officials and environmental groups in order to determine the next steps in the case.

“The court held clearly that the Trump administration needs to rationally consider the consequences of its decision. Those include dire impacts to clean water, public health and our climate,” said Earthjustice attorney Jenny Harbine, who represents environmental groups and the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, which had sued to stop the lease sales.

The attorneys general of California, New Mexico, New York and Washington, all Democrats, also had sued over the resumption of the federal coal lease program. They said it should not have been revived without studying what’s best for the environment and for taxpayers.

Representatives of the Interior Department did not immediately respond to emailed and telephone requests for comment.

Utah coal leases

In February, Interior officials had announced a sale of coal leases on public lands in Utah by issuing a statement headlined “The War on Coal is Over.” They said the sale would not have been possible if the administration had not overturned the moratorium.

The department’s Bureau of Land Management administers about 300 coal leases in 10 states. Most of that coal, 85%, comes from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Other states with significant federal coal reserves include Colorado and New Mexico.

Production and combustion of coal from federal lands accounted for about 11% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2014.

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California Parents Who Shackled Kids Get Life Terms

A California couple who for years starved a dozen of their children and kept some shackled to beds were sentenced Friday to life in prison, ending a shocking case that revealed a house of horrors hidden behind a veneer of suburban normalcy. 

 

The conditions inside David and Louise Turpin’s home in suburban Los Angeles came to light only after one of their daughters fled and begged a 911 operator for help. The parents pleaded guilty in February of neglect and abuse. 

 

The sentencing was preceded by the first public statements from some of the children, who alternately spoke of love for their parents and of what they had suffered, as the couple wiped away tears. None of the children was publicly identified. 

 

One of the adult children walked into court already in tears, holding hands with a prosecutor. 

‘They almost changed me’

 

“Life may have been bad, but it made me strong. I fought to become the person that I am. I saw my dad change my mom. They almost changed me, but I realized what was happening. … I’m a fighter. I’m strong and I’m shooting through life like a rocket,” a daughter said.  

The Turpins will be eligible for parole after 25 years. 

 

“I’m sorry for everything I’ve done to hurt my children. I love my children so much,” Louise Turpin said. 

 

One of the children asked for a lighter sentence for the parents because “they believed everything they did was to protect us.” 

 

The home in a middle-class section of Perris, a small city about 60 miles (96 kilometers) southeast of Los Angeles, appeared to be neatly kept, and neighbors rarely saw the kids outside, but nothing triggered suspicion. 

 

But when deputies arrived, they were shocked to find a 22-year-old son chained to a bed and two girls who had just been set free from shackles. Most of the 13 children — who ranged in age from 2 to 29 — were severely underweight and had not bathed for months. The house was covered in filth and was filled with the stench of human waste. 

 

The children said they were beaten, caged and shackled if they did not obey their parents. 

 

David Turpin, 57, had been an engineer for Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman. Louise Turpin, 50, was listed as a housewife in a 2011 bankruptcy filing. 

Limited knowledge

 

The teenage daughter escaped by jumping from a window. After a lifetime in isolation, the 17-year-old did not know her address, the month or the year, or what the word “medication” meant. 

 

But she knew enough to punch 911 into a barely workable cellphone and began describing years of horrific abuse to a police dispatcher. 

 

Deputies testified that the children said they were allowed to shower only once a year. They were mainly kept in their rooms except for meals, which had been reduced from three to one per day, a combination of lunch and dinner. The 17-year-old complained that she could no longer stomach peanut butter sandwiches — they made her gag.  

The children were not allowed to play like normal children. Other than an occasional family trip to Las Vegas or Disneyland, they rarely left home. They slept during the day and were active a few hours at night. 

 

Although the couple filed paperwork with the state to home-school their children, learning was limited. The oldest daughter had completed only the third grade. 

 

“We don’t really do school. I haven’t finished first grade,” the 17-year-old said, according to Deputy Manuel Campos. 

 

Investigators found that the couple’s toddler had not been abused, but all of the children were hospitalized.

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В Україні почався «день тиші»

Опівночі починається «день тиші» напередодні другого туру виборів президента України, коли заборонена агітація за будь-кого з кандидатів.

Згідно з частиною 2 статті 57 закону «Про вибори президента України», передвиборна агітація закінчується о 24-й годині останньої п’ятниці перед днем виборів.

Стаття 58 цього закону серед форм виборчої агітації визначає, зокрема, «оприлюднення в друкованих та аудіовізуальних (електронних) засобах масової інформації політичної реклами, виступів, інтерв’ю, нарисів, відеофільмів, аудіо- та відеокліпів, інших публікацій та повідомлень», а також «проведення концертів, вистав, спортивних змагань, демонстрації фільмів та телепередач чи інших публічних заходів за підтримки партії – суб’єкта виборчого процесу чи кандидата на пост президента України, а також оприлюднення інформації про таку підтримку».

Раніше сьогодні відбулися дебати між кандидатами Володимиром Зеленським та Петром Порошенком. 

Читайте більше: «Конкурс капітанів»: перші реакції соцмереж на дебати Порошенка й Зеленського

За офіційними результатами першого туру виборів президента України, за Володимира Зеленського проголосували 30,24% виборців, за чинного главу держави Петра Порошенка – 15,95% виборців. Другий тур відбудеться 21 квітня.

Проголосувати на дільницях можна буде з восьмої ранку до восьмої вечора. 

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В Україні почався «день тиші»

Опівночі починається «день тиші» напередодні другого туру виборів президента України, коли заборонена агітація за будь-кого з кандидатів.

Згідно з частиною 2 статті 57 закону «Про вибори президента України», передвиборна агітація закінчується о 24-й годині останньої п’ятниці перед днем виборів.

Стаття 58 цього закону серед форм виборчої агітації визначає, зокрема, «оприлюднення в друкованих та аудіовізуальних (електронних) засобах масової інформації політичної реклами, виступів, інтерв’ю, нарисів, відеофільмів, аудіо- та відеокліпів, інших публікацій та повідомлень», а також «проведення концертів, вистав, спортивних змагань, демонстрації фільмів та телепередач чи інших публічних заходів за підтримки партії – суб’єкта виборчого процесу чи кандидата на пост президента України, а також оприлюднення інформації про таку підтримку».

Раніше сьогодні відбулися дебати між кандидатами Володимиром Зеленським та Петром Порошенком. 

Читайте більше: «Конкурс капітанів»: перші реакції соцмереж на дебати Порошенка й Зеленського

За офіційними результатами першого туру виборів президента України, за Володимира Зеленського проголосували 30,24% виборців, за чинного главу держави Петра Порошенка – 15,95% виборців. Другий тур відбудеться 21 квітня.

Проголосувати на дільницях можна буде з восьмої ранку до восьмої вечора. 

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US Federal Space for Holding Migrant Families Mostly Unused

President Donald Trump has warned that Central American families are staging an “invasion” at the U.S.-Mexico border. He has threatened to take migrants to Democratic strongholds to punish political opponents. And his administration regularly complains about having to “catch and release” migrants.

At the same time, his administration has stopped using one of three family detention centers to hold parents and children and left almost 2,000 beds unused at the other two. It says it does not have the resources to transport migrants to the centers.

Immigrant advocates accuse the administration of closing off family detention to further the perception of a crisis.

The Karnes County Residential Center in Texas used to hold up to 800 parents and children at a time, who would usually be detained before an initial screening to judge whether they qualified for asylum.

But ICE last month started to release families until they were all gone from Karnes. Advocates who work there say ICE is now restricting legal access to the roughly 400 adult women being detained there.

The population at the family detention center in nearby Dilley, Texas, was also reduced and remains at roughly a quarter of its 2,400-person capacity. A 96-person facility in Pennsylvania had only 18 immigrants this week.

Meanwhile, the numbers of parents and children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border have surged, leading immigration officials to declare the situation a crisis. More than 50,000 parents and children were apprehended by the Border Patrol in March, setting a monthly record.

The number of border crossings in one day sometimes exceeds ICE’s total family detention space.

More than 4,800 people crossed the border in a single day this week. Almost 1,000 were traveling in three large groups, the largest of which was 375 people, Kevin McAleenan, the acting secretary of homeland security, said Wednesday.

The Border Patrol has stopped referring many families to ICE and instead releases them directly to nonprofit groups or drops them off at bus stations.

In a statement, ICE said the surge left it “overwhelmed” and unable to transport families from the border to the Karnes and Dilley facilities, even if both detention centers had available beds. As of Wednesday, 427 women were in custody at Karnes.

“As such, ICE has determined that, at this time, Karnes will better meet operational needs by also serving partially as an adult detention facility,” the agency said.

Immigrant advocates say they do not believe that ICE cannot transport people to the facilities. They say the government has reduced family detention space for political reasons _ to show that Democrats’ refusal to change laws to allow for longer family detention and more deportations has left officials with no choice but to catch and release.

“We believe that this is part of trying to justify a narrative,” said Peter Schey, executive director of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law. “Trump’s policies have swung from one extreme to the other. There’s no consistency; there’s no strategic planning.”

The legal services group RAICES goes to Karnes daily to consult with detained immigrants about their asylum cases. The group says subtle policy changes at the facility have reduced legal access for detained women seeking asylum.

Since Monday, authorities at Karnes have prevented attorneys and volunteers from meeting with many large groups of migrants at once, which prevents them from quickly consulting with more people, according to Andrea Meza, RAICES’ director of family detention services.

Karnes staff also stopped sending RAICES the names of detainees who put their names on sign-up sheets outside the visitation room, Meza said.

Meza said she received conflicting explanations from ICE for the changes, including that there were complaints by staff from the private contractor GEO Group, which operates Karnes.

ICE confirmed it had reduced group meetings at Karnes because “more residents are represented by private attorneys.” The agency said it provided 12 hours of legal visitation at Karnes every day, more than its detention standards require.

If the changes remain in place, fewer people will be able to consult with a lawyer before asylum interviews, Meza said, and it will be harder for the group to follow up with potential asylum seekers.

“We don’t know what’s happening to people after their interviews,” she said.

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